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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the poll than meets the eye. he is here to tell you next. also, former secretary of state kissinger -- does he think the u.s. should draw a red line to stop iran's nuclear buildup? hear straight from dr. kissinger. and mark fly and ann coulter take on the ladies. view. you have to see this one. and you will be talking about this tomorrow. dont move. "on the"on the record" back in 0 seconds. >> the estion who hats edge. polls in swing states showing president obama pulling ahead of governor mitt romney, but not so fast. dick morris, author of new book "here come the black helicopters" has something to say about the polls. he joins us. nice to see you, dick. dick, you may be perhaps the only one who's saying that these polls suggest that governor romney is winning. please tell me how you arrive at that. >> sure. well, karl rove i think has some thoughts like that. let me go through it. what's going on now is these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2012 that you had in 2008. not the normal level, which you had in '04, '00,
, james baker, henry kissinger, secretary schultz, praising mitt romney in an op-ed. for more, bring in national security analyst, kt mcfarland and over her shoulder, is that a picture of henry kissinger behind threw? >> it is. and kelly, i spent seven years working for henry kissinger in the nixon and ford administration. >> kelly: that's right, you did. kt, let me ask you, based on your experience, how do you respond to president obama and others criticizing mitt romney on foreign policy. >> it's silly, they sound exactly like jimmy carter did in 1980, saying ronald reagan, he's not smart enough to be president, he doesn't have any foreign policy experience. and yet, what did reagan do? he came in and did what none of the other people could, he won the cold war without firing a shot. so, the question is, is romney reagan? and you've had the single-most successful secretary of state in post war history, writing an editorial, he is and understands the single greatest national security threat. yes. >> kelly: let me ask you, give the tone and tenor of what they said. former secretary o
of the foremost authorities on the middle east when dr. henry kissinger joins us life with his take on what -- live with his take on what we are seeing right now on this earth. but first we go to leland vittert who has just arrived in cairo. his photographer is not there yet, so he is coming with us via laptop, and the situation is precarious. leland? >> reporter: well, so long as the laptop the balcony, we're going to be okay, megyn. we're about 18 stories up, and you can hear from here the tear gas rounds going out from the police positions which are guarding the u.s. embassy about a block and a half from our position. go ahead and take a look at the live picture down on the ground. these protesters have been trading tear gas canisters, molotov cocktails and rocks with the police all day. we have heard at least a couple of hundred people injured here in cairo as this protest now enters its third day. 9/11 on tuesday, yesterday was wednesday, today being thursday of the main protests here in cairo outside the u.s. embassy, and we are bracing for friday which is expected to be a major day o
to the embassy. there was a message from kissinger telling us israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger will move forward. at that time they egyptian and civilian armies were already on the way to destroy the jewish state. the prime minister at the time was afraid to take a preemptive attack to say i don't know the reaction in washington. nixon was going down, and she was afraid of his reaction. we almost lost the war. we have to take the decision but with the u.n. for sure maybe being sponsored there be a committee to look at the decision but on the today secretary clinton says this is a mistake. if you do with the enemy in the middle east you don't play in the middle east, jerusalem or be an up. if you went to convince someone but in my book we have to take action but i think what has happened to in the last month as a decision our friend in canada took to close the embassy in tehran. embassy in tehran. we should have done that years ago. in two weeks time we are traveling again to the u.s. but then go back to ram with the race for the nuclear bomb. if iran be
in 2009 he was in cairo and even henry kissinger came out the other day and said we cannot as a government apologize for what these people construe as a provocation if our government was no way involved. i think romney was completely within his rights to express the failure of the embassy on that point. >> i take matt's point about the nature of the statement. it was a little bit, i thought it was legitimate quite frankly, we're in a presidential campaign and oh, my gosh, politics. >> how dare they talk about a presidential responsibility like, say, foreign policy. >> but, while it is true that romney has not been talking about it, it's also true that neither one of these candidates want to deal with foreign policy in in campaign. barack obama as we've said on this program previously is the president who wanted to put the world on the back burner until after the election specifically what has been going on in syria. now the world has forced itself upon both of these candidates and mitt romney at that point was not prepared to talk in a broader context, and this subject deserves to be addre
. you know, henry kissinger used to come to press conferences and say, who has questions for my answers, and that's a very -- that's what people are coached to do. what's unusual is mitt romney actually ar titiculating that. >> when we sit around and watch and someone says, he dodged the question, do you care for the most part? >> from our experiments we find that for the most part viewers don't notice, and that's because the answers are usually similar enough to the questions and cognitively it's really hard to follow each logical piece of a response and then keep linking it back to the question. so as long as it doesn't feel incongruous, most people don't notice. it's because humans have a limited amount of attention and they need to direct it to the most important thing and in this case it's social evaluation. >> joj, i issue a challenge to all of our viewers, look for the artful dodge this wednesday night and listen to what todd roger had to say about it. todd from the harvard kennedy school. >> thanks, gary. >> you can see the live coverage of the debate beginning at 7:00 eastern t
with me when mr. kissinger was having talks on disengagement with golda meir and she wass on innocent. she wouldn't agree to withdraw a few kilometers on the suez canal or from the golan heights. what happened? and the verybright young air force officer who was then military attache in washington itzhak rabin quickly and precipitously moved from washington to tel aviv and became prime minister and signed the agreement with the united states for the disengagement >> and was out of government and came back and was assassinated by-- so mr. kissinger was the one who went over that change in israel have the way i see it now it's mr. netanyahu that's maneuvering to change government in the united states. >> rose: you think so? >> i don't know! >> rose: it's good to have you here. you'll be in georgetown teaching. in the fall. >> yes, sir. >> rose: what will you speech in >> about saudi arabia basically and they ask me-- the professors bring me to their classroom and talk about the kingdom. >> rose: thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: thank you for joining us. see you next time.
the ceo of ibm wants to truce a colleague of yours, henry kissinger, that way. henry kissinger came up to the podium and as lou gerstner, then ceo of ibm and said your introduction was far too modest. and so the next time when he stood up and introduced and again and talked about his nobel peace prize and his bestsellers and influence on history and told the whole story about how he thought he needed no introduction, but he thought this time he had to give it up because of last time, to which henry kissinger came to the podium and said, it is true, lou, that no minneapolis introduction lesson idea, but no man appreciates one more. so thank you, president degioia. so these men don't need introduction. i will say however how unusual it is for this audience to have three former national security advisers, to assert republicans come up on his the democrat on this stage. i also have to be a little careful because they are rows of board members said they plan to counsel and therefore my bosses. this is a week on friday when we will be launching the atlantic council to brent scowcroft sentra
of ibm wants to introduce a colleague of yours, henry kissinger, that way. henry kissinger came up to the podium and said, "your introduction was far too modest ." so the next time he introduced again and talked about his nobel peace prize and books and best sellers and influence on history and told the whole story about how he thought he needed no introduction, but he thought this time he had to give it because of last time, to which henry kissinger came to the podium and said, cassette and it is true that no man needs an introduction less than i do, but no man appreciates one more -- "it is true that no man needs an introduction less than i do, but no man appreciates one more." these men do not need an introduction, but i will say how unusual it is for this audience to have three former national security advisers, two of whom served republicans, one who served a democrat, on the stage. i have to be a little careful here because they are also board members of the atlantic council and therefore, my bosses. this is a week on friday when we will be launching at the atlantic council,
. >> this is not a winner for you, richard. even china stuff, henry kissinger, sat on the sidelines and said, romney, this isn't the best way to deal with the chinese. who knows about china other than henry kissinger. >> let's be clear, china's not an enemy. it may not be entirely an ally either. it has been, probably will to be for decades to come, something in between. countries are, and that's the world as we find it. you can try to say america needs to project leadership. what are we are going to do in libya right now in terms of leadership that they're talking about? >> right. >> there a role for the military? is that the kind of strength that they assume? one thing you would think about the kinds of advisers about mitt romney they would have learned some lessons from their experience in iraq, namely that military, american military, is the supreme fighting force this world has ever seen. they're freetremendously good a fighting wars and winning wars. the whole post-regime change sent nar yo was a mess, to put it mildly. at that point you need diplomats. they are going to be at risk. you cannot
kissinger telling us the israelis, wait, hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on diplomatic efforts. by too tim the helicopter was sent, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. >> it's something that maybe one day there will be a committee to look at the decision in the u.n. but also invite the u.s., secretary clinton said only a few hours ago, we should not put any red lines to iran. when you deal with the enemies in the middle east, you don't play according to the rules of washington, d.c., jerusalem or vienna. it is a different ball game. it's a different language. if you want to work with somebody in iran to stop the nuclear race, you have to take action. and in my book i worried very directly that it is not enough to talk. we need to take action. and we have seen that sanctions are not crippling sanctions. and i think what happened the last month in the decision that our friend in canada took to close the embassy in tehran, it is a brave decision. we should have done it years ago. because the people in
mesmerized. [laughter] >> i saw dr. kissinger and i asked how we were perceived around the world. he said one word, weak. unfortunately, it is no wonder that the leader of north korea set up long-range missiles one week after he said he wouldn't. >> [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> i appreciate the idea. on a typical day like this when i do three or four things like this, i get a number of foreign policy questions. the american people are not concentrated at all on china or russia or iran or iraq. it is unbankable to let 20 or 30,000 troops to stay in iraq. we had the hostages in i ran and we had the two helicopters crashed. that was talked about. if something of that nature presents itself, i woke will work to solve the problem. >> [inaudible] how do think the palestinian problem can be solved? >> i am torn by two perspectives. i have had one for some time which is that the palestinians have no interest in establishing peace and that the pathway to peace is almost unthinkable to accomplish. it is said the palestinians should set up their own country. the conflic
by henry kissinger in a book called "crisis," a conversation with president nixon, says to him, you know, we were close to a nuclear con froppation today. now, what changed since 1962 was that american superiority had shung. the russians were five years from passing us in numbers of of nuclear weapons, but they were already feeling earlier, the general secretary told a party conference in prague that by 1985 the correlation of forces shifted irreversibly in the soviet union's favor, and we can work the wealth. that did not approve to be a better forecast than in 1961, but the point is, it's not whether you think the weapons matter, nuclear balance or changes in it matter. it's an operational question. if one or more parties to a crisis think that it matters, and behave differently as a result of changes, they matter. at minimum, it raises the risks in a crisis. at maximum, it could, although it didn't in 197 #, could end a crisis to end differently. when we look at china, and we are assuming china is not in a time of a huge military buildup, the soviet 25-year build up in the early 70s a
. when kissinger did the strategic shift. egypt from a pro sew yet enemy to pro-american ally. we have dominated the region. we are now in retreat. obama, himself, said we're doing a pivot out of the middle east to the pacific. proclaimed the tide of war is over. he took us out of iraq. we're leaving no residual, of course he announced withdrawal from afghanistan on a timetable. when it came to arab spring, he was indecisive. in iran he would not support protesters. libya half in and half out. everybody in the region understands that america had been the dominant element. in withdrawal is not interested. arab are apoplectic about iran going nuclear, not just israel. now our friends are looking around saying do we have anybody who is supporting it? the extreme jihaddist and the moderate jihaddist in the region saying this is our time. that is what is -- i'll give you one example of the withdrawal of the influence. syria. does anybody in the region ask what is the american position? everybody wants to know what russia is doing and thinking. and what supplies it's saying, what is iran doi
on the negotiations with henry kissinger, the negotiations that took place in paris. i was like, wow, how do i get to see this? before that, i had not saw much. i started to copy by hand the contents of the letter. i couldn't have a computer into the reading room. well, the next day when i went back because i returned the folder without finishing copying down the documents, i went back the next day, and the archives were back. i go up to her, and this time, she gave me the folders, and i tried to find the one with the x. i was like, oh, i'm missing a folder. there was one with an x. she said, you were not allowed to see that, no, no, no. i was like, okay, but, of course, after she said i couldn't see it, i wanted to see if. i had to finish and get the documents. i waited, i bided the time, waited, and she went back to classes, and i was able to copy the entire contents of that folder. it was amazing. you know, i had visions of myself being arrested and languishing this jail and my family would have to spring me, but it was a successful story. despite, and i'll put danger in quotes and politics of
you were vice president. >> yes. >> what are the circumstances of that picture? henry kisse kissinger at the to. >> that's during official visit of president nixon to vietnam. >> why were you vice president? that story about why you were vice president seems to bother you to this day. >> well, as you know, i become premier 1965. and then i brought back a stability and unity. >> before you go any further, how did you become premier? >> well, you know, from -- after the military queue against -- >> 1963. >> then from november '63 to july '65 before i become premier, during a period of time only about two years, there are five or six changes in vietnam. we begin with a military government. it last a few months, and then a mixed civilian and military government. and then few months later, go back again to military. but anyway, the last government in the south before i become premier was civilian government. that mean the chief of state, mr. shue was the civilian. the prime minister was a civilian. but i think because they belong to two different political group. so they continued to fight
. in 1973 he appointed henry kissinger secretary of state, the first jewish person to hold that post and serve as secretary of state andsiltanusly. y'veot a good trivia suggestion, i'm us. we'll atone for not using it if we don't. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] at&t the nation's largest 4g network. now covering 3000 more 4g cities and towns than verizon. . rethink possible. >>> this is a guy i kwho cares. he cares. you don't like him being misinterpreted. it important what mitt can bring to this country. >> that was ann romney on the "tonight show" with jay leno last night depending her hba on the criticism of the now infamousideo of the 47%. let' bring back our panel. you were pointing out, sarah, decratgobo ane republicans, some of them got hut. they seem to be counting on% coattails. >> i think that's right. as you see the presidential race tighten, which it has -- nationally has since the democratic conveion, i think, you'll see these senates, also tighten back up in places where republicans have been up wherthey're more cfortably and reliablreliable. ll w little
conservatives but a few are actually taking his side. former secretary of state henry kissinger says he can understand romney's severe reaction to the violence. jim demint called romney absolutely right on libya and senator jon kyl said the u.s. embassy's response is the same as blaming a rape victim and then asking them for an apology. more bill press is coming up live after the break. we're live in chat, current.com/billpress. we have a big, big hour and the i.q. will go way up. how are you ever going to solve the problem if you don't look at all of the pieces? >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. >>sharp tongue, quick whit and above all, politically direct. >>you just think there is no low they won't go to. oh, no. if al gore's watching today... so, you guys grew up together. yes, since third grade... what are you lookin' at? not looking at i anything... we're not good enough for you. must be supermodels? what do you model gloves? brad, eat a snick
points there and i would like to give you a historic reference which was henry kissinger used to say the first question in a crisis is, where are the aircraft carriers? the reason that question is asked, aircraft carriers are sovereign american territory. we have forces stationed in the middle east in many of the countries because we always have to coordinate with those governments what military actions we take the real advantage of a aircraft carrier it is able to move wherever it wants and do whatever it wants without permission from a third country. the president and national command authority love to have aircraft carriers because they are flexible and can respond to emerging crises without coordination with countries that may not support our foreign policy and security goals. melissa: that's a great point. even when they were out there they replenish the ship by bringing another ship next door to it and fuel and supplies and jet fuel for that very point that you made so they don't have to go into port with a country that may or may not want them. they can stay on the seas. thank
you an historic reference which was henry kissinger used to say the first question in a crisis is, where are the aircraft carriers. the reason that question is asked, aircraft carriers are sovereign american territory. we have forces stationed throughout the middle east in many of the countries there but we always have to coordinate with those governments what military actions we take. the real advantage of an aircraft carrier is it is able to move wherever it wants and able to do whatever it wants without permission from a third country. so the president and the national command authority love having aircraft carriers because they are flexible and they can respond to emerging crises without coordination with countries that may not support our foreign policy and security goals. melissa: up next, it really was a once in a lifetime experience to tail hook onto the aircraft carrier and to get the rare chance to get a chance to spend the night on board the uss enterprise with the outstanding crew. i will tell it what it took for me to get my sea legs, when we come back with more of ou
and henry kissinger who was secretary for both president ford and nixon as well they are in the washington times if america is strong around the world and be a leader, you need a strong economy and make money. >> gretchen: that is what star power you are in favor of. hollywood type or secretary of state type of star power. >> brian: in terms of foreign policy. it is vitally person. it is significant that eight politically respected guys and condoleezza rice come out and say, for foreign policy and strength of defense, we need mitt romney as president. it would make more news if adlin albright weighed n. >> steve: that would be a fox news alert. mitt romney calling the democrats out of touch with the american people after their party flat form took out the name god and jerusalem as well doug is live in woodstock vermont with the latest today. hello, doug las. >> omission of god and jerusalem as the capitol of israel from the democratic party platform is resonated as an unforced error. but not only republicans. but look at the reaction in the arena when a voice vote was taken. >> one more ti
at what was going on in the united states. and you can even see this in henry kissinger's memoirs and on historical record and an archives in our archives over here how the negotiator for the north vietnamese would bring this up to kissinger. he would bring up what was going on in congress, was going on in the streets to try to rattle kissinger who would always answer this is beneath me, i'm not going to talk about what's going on in the united states. at any end i i believe that north vietnamese leaders never really relied on negotiations to win the war. they knew that they had to win on their own and it had to be militarily on the ground. thank you. >> several years ago i had the opportunity to travel around the it now for six weeks, about half the time in the north, which is to be the north, about half the time in the south. and in talking with people, my impression was people in the north, very proud of having defeated the united states, the great power. people in the south, very sad that the united states hadn't in some way managed to stay, to keep with economists. is that co
by henry kissinger in a book called crises, conversation with richard nixon, president nixon says to them, you know we were close to nuclear confrontation today. now, what had changed since 1962 was that american superiority had shrunk. the russians were five years from passing us in numbers of nuclear weapons. but they already were feeling, earlier in 1970, leonid brezhnev had told the party conference in prague that by 1985 the correlation of forces will have shifted irreversibly into something save and will be able to work our will. that did not prove to be much better forecast the crew chefs in 1961. but the point is it is a what you think these weapons met or the nuclear balance will change. it's an operational question. if one or more parties to a crisis think that it matters, and behave different as a result of changes, they matter to at minimum it raises the risk in a crisis. at maximum and occurred as the 1973, it could cause a crisis to end differently. so we look at china and we are assuming that china is not at the time of the huge military buildup, the biggest since the sovie
was married to joe al-assad -- i'll set up and was a downtown washington d.c. socialite. kissinger once said that more decisions than things were made in your living room than the white house. she really brought so many movers and shakers in the u.s. and the world to gather. it's a real delight. >> did in a new biography just come out? >> i believe so. there is a play on broadway, too. >> with john lithgow. >> right, exactly. >> what should we know about biking? told us that, how long has it been around? >> cheese, i think it is something like 79 years. i should know the birthdate of viking and i don't and i'm sorry. i know the logo is rockwell kent, the beautiful viking ship. so, yeah. >> what kind of titles do you look for? what kind of authors? >> award-winning nonfiction, literary fiction, but we also enjoy commercial fiction as well. a wide right the newsmakers and we really focus on books and authors that will help, help the dialogue and learn more and start getting people curious. >> we are here at book expo america committee annual convention in new york city. how important is a conv
arms control, but not mitt romney. republican sos of state from kissinger to powell to rice, president bush, 71 united states senators all supported president obama's new start streety. but not mitt romney. he's even blurted out the preposterous notion that russia is our number one political geopolitical foe. sarah palin said she could see russia from alaska. mitt romney talks like he's only seeing russia by watching rocky 4. [ cheers and applause ] so here is the choice, here is the choice in 2012, mitt romney out of touch at home, out of his depth abroad and out of the main stream. barak obama, a president who is getting new life and truth to america's indispensable role in the world. a commander in chief who gives our troops the tools and training they need in war, the honor and help they have earned when they come home. a man, a man, a man who will never ask other men and women to fight a war without a plan to win the peace. let me say something else. let me say something else. no nominee for president should ever fail in the midst of a war to pay tribute to our troops overseas in
among them the liesman about the architects of the cold war ferc, the biography of henry kissinger and albert einstein and a marvelously readable biography about one of my heroes, benjamin franklin. "the washington post" called his book fresh, lively, imaginative and wonderfully written. from book to book walter has driven to explain what it is that makes a great leader not only young nation but of science, ideology and commerce. walter is one of those people that moves easily from history to politics to miscommunication and there is a reason why. he's been the editor of "time" magazine, the chairman and cnn, the chairman of the broadcasting board of governors, the chairman of teach for america. somewhere along the way he began to turn his voracious appetite for a good story to making stories of the zone. steve jobs, his latest book is a deeply absorbing exploration of the might and personality of the founder and chief of apple incorporated. given the story to hear from steve jobs himself to write an authorized biography, someone else might have turned the book into a puff piece, h
you scratch your head. it's richard nixon. in 1973 he appointed henry kissinger secretary of state, the first jewish person to hold that post and serve as secretary of state andsimultaneously. if you've got a good trivia suggestion, i'm us. we'll atone for not using it if we don't. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] at&t. the nation's largest 4g network. now covering 3000 more 4g cities and towns than verizon. at&t. rethink possible. now covering 3000 more 4g cities and towns than verizon. sleep train's inveis ending soon. sale save 10%, 20%, even 35% on a huge selection of simmons and sealy clearance mattresses. get 2 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. even get free delivery! sleep train stacks the savings high to keep the prices low. but hurry, the inventory clearance sale is ending soon. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >>> this is a guy i know who cares. he cares 100%. you don't like him being misinterpreted. it's important what mitt can bring to this country. >
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)